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The Solitariness of God

The Solitariness of God

“In the beginning, God” (Gen 1:1).  There was a time, if “time” it could be called, when God, in the unity of His nature (though subsisting equally in three Divine Persons), dwelt all alone.  “In the beginning, God.”  There was no heaven, where His glory is not particularly manifested.  There was no earth to engage His attention.  There were no angels to hymn His praises; no universe to be upheld by the world of His power.  There was nothing, no one, but God; and that, not for a day, a year, or an age, but “from everlasting.”  During a past eternity, God was alone; self-contained, self sufficient, self-satisfied; in need of nothing.  Had a universe, had angels, had human beings been necessary to Him any way, there also had been called into existence from all eternity.  The creating of them when He did, added nothing to God essentially.  He changes not (Mal. 3:6), therefore His essential glory can be neither augmented nor diminished.

God was under no constraint, no obligation, no necessity to create.  That He chose to do so was purely a sovereign act on His part, caused by nothing outside Himself, determined by nothing but His own mere good pleasure; for He “worketh all things after the counsel of His own will” (Eph. 1:11).  That He did create was simply for His manifestative glory.  Do some of our readers imagine that we have gone beyond what Scripture warrants?  Then our appeal shall be to the Law and the Testimony; “Stand up and bless the Lord your God forever and ever; and blessed be Thy glorious name, which is exalted above all blessing and praise (Neh. 9:5).  God is no gainer even from our worship.  His was in no need of that external glory of His grace which arises from His redeemed, for He is glorious enough in Himself without that.  What was it that moved Him to predestinate His elect to the praise of the Glory of His grace?  It was, as Eph. 1:5 tells us, “according to the good pleasure of His will.”

(Pink, The Attributes of God, p. 9-10)