Tag Archives: servant

Day 7 of 40 Days of Prayer for America 9.04.12

Target: Public Servants
Proverbs 29:2 “When the righteous are in authority, the people rejoice; But when a wicked man rules, the people groan.”

Founding Father Quote:  “The man who is conscientiously doing his duty will ever be protected by that righteous and all powerful Being; and when he has finished his work, he will receive an ample reward.”

Prayer: O Lord, thank You for our American form of government which allows the common citizen to rise to positions of influence. We ask Your forgiveness for not being good stewards over this great privilege. While righteousness exalts a nation, we have fallen into a spirit of complacency. We have taken so much for granted and allowed our public offices to become occupied by the ungodly. We have failed to speak out, to vote, to educate others on the Biblical principles surrounding Election Day. Forgive us, Father, for not actively seeking You regarding public affairs. Give our public servants the mind of Christ, that they might use their authority for good. We ask that our leaders seek Your plans for our country, our states, our cities. May we exalt You in our public hallways; may Your name constantly be on our lips. We praise You as the one true God, for Your mercy and Your faithfulness to us, an undeserving people. We ask for wisdom to saturate every man and woman in a place of authority, so that this nation can return to her first love, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. May we build a stronger America for the sake of our children, and our children’s children. As we enter election season, may You begin to prepare men and women who have a heart to not only hear, but act upon the promises found in Your Word. May these anointed leaders be placed in offices You have designed for them, that we might rise up again as the world’s strongest nation, one nation under God. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

B90X2012 “Servant Song #5″

The fifth and final song comes in Isaiah 61:1-11.  The good news comes.  The Servant is anointed to bring the messianic jubilee, where the people will be restored to the land after exile.  There is no introduction by God.  The servant says, ‘here I am.’  Lots of review and progression from the previous Songs.

Look at all the verbs involved in what the Servant has done and is going to do- preach, bind, proclaim, release, proclaim (again), comfort, provide, bestow, rebuild, restore, and renew.

Isaiah’s tree imagery pops out in v. 3- ‘oaks of righteousness.’

Jesus broke the silence and the mystery of who the Servant was in Luke 4 when he preaches his first sermon.  He purposely turns to Isaiah 61 and reads a portion of that Song.  He purposely stopped short at the section about vengeance because that day has not come yet.  His time on earth at that time was for revelation about Father and reconciliation of humanity.

Then ironically, right after this first sermon and the unveiling of his Messiahship, the crowd wants to take him out and push him off a cliff.  Now that is a flashy kick-off to a preaching tour.  Kind of makes me not feel so bad.  Folks didn’t want to kill me after my first sermon.

Everything explodes with Jesus!  He is the Servant.  He is the mystery man.  Everything stated in the five Servant Songs is true and is fulfilled.  A new definition of freedom- not just socio/economic, but physical and spiritual as well.

I hope you have enjoyed this brief tour into this special literary aspect of Isaiah.  It is so cool to find this stuff and see how the Holy Spirit wove it into the Word.

“It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings.” Prov. 25:2

B90X2012 “Servant Song #4″

The Fourth Song is the most well-known of the Servant Songs comes to us from Isaiah 52:13-53:12.  The most graphic and appalling of descriptions regarding who the servant is and what the purpose of his mission on the planet is.  The fourth song is the most elaborate and poignant of them all.  It is the zenith of Isaiah’s message and discussion about who God is and what he is about.  It is as though we forgot the message and Isaiah needed to remind us with suddenness and intrusiveness.  Almost as if he is screaming at us, “Don’t you get the picture.  Let me draw it out for you one more time.”  The irony of it all- the servant is exalted yet abused and quiet. Buried within the Song is kind of a macro view of birth to death.

Vv. 52:13- 53:1 God is speaking

Vv. 53:2-6 Israel is speaking

Vv. 53:7-12 God is speaking

Notice in this whole section who says nothing.

Servant Song #1 was a picture of a king, #2 had hints of a prophet, and in this one we have the qualifications of a priest (52:15).

In the Ancient Near East (ANE), one would cover their mouths with their hand as they approach another king.  Here is 52:15, we see that the Servant is the King of kings, all, including kings, will shut their mouths because of who this servant is!  What a picture.

I love the flow at the end of the song- The dead (9) is alive (11), the condemned (8) is righteous (11), and the helpless (7) is the victor (12)!!  That is us friends.  The whole reason for Jesus coming to the planet.  The story of redemption and presence in our lives.

B90X2012 “Servant Song #1″

Imagine for a moment you are a citizen of Judah during the prophetic span of Isaiah’s ministry.  The dates maybe somewhere around 740-700 BC.  You saw your brothers in the North fall under siege to the Assyrians and there are strong, very strong warnings that the Babylonians are coming your way to do the same to you in the South.  Mingled in Isaiah’s words are those of hope.  A surprising mention of a servant.  In obviously distinctive and fresh language, a vision and an application of a servant who will do things for the nation never before seen or heard.  The ‘servant of God’ strand flowing through Isaiah marks a significant mysterious character whose qualities rival any prophet, priest, or king.  Five ‘songs’ are featured in the latter portions of Isaiah.

Who is this servant?  If you were hearing Isaiah’s words, you would truly be baffled.  Is it Cyrus, Hezekiah, Eliakim, a missionary, Isaiah himself, a reincarnated Moses or Elijah, the nation of Israel, another king, God himself, is it the people of God corporately, are they individual ‘believers’, or is it an individual who is a messianic figure?  The options abound for the hearers.  He is a mystery man!

The servant is first introduced in Is. 42:1-9 “Here is my servant” the great solution.

Vv. 1-4 God addresses Israel.  Justice is used three times in these verses (1, 3, and 4).  He is not just for Israel, but for the nations (Gentiles) (1). Notice how gentile he is and full of humility (2, 3).

Vv. 5-7  God (Ha’ El- “He who is indeed the true transcendent God”) addresses the Servant.  His purpose is delineated in (6,7) “a light for the Gentiles.”  There is a future reference to Is. 61 in v. 7 “to free the captives from prison and to release from the dungeon those who sit in darkness.” Also this verse looks back at Isaiah 7.

Vv. 8-9 God address Israel again.

There is a hint of opposition; his task is not easy, but doable.  The character and mission of the Servant: will bring salvation and a new world order.  The Spirit and justice dominate this ‘song.’

B90X “the Servant of the LORD” Day 53 (Is 52:13- Is 66:18)

Another beautiful day in Colorado Saints!

Imagine for a moment you are a citizen of Judah during the prophetic span of Isaiah’s ministry.  The dates maybe somewhere around 740-700 BC.  You saw your brothers in the North fall underseige to the Assyrians and there are strong, very strong warnings that the Babylonians are coming your way to do the same to you in the South.  Mingled in Isaiah’s words are those of hope.  A surprising mention of a servant.  In obviously distinctive and fresh language, a vision and an application of a servant who will do things for the nation never before seen or heard.  The ‘servant of God’ strand flowing through Isaiah marks a significant mysterious character whose qualities rival any prophet, priest, or king.  Five ‘songs’ are featured in the latter portions of Isaiah.

 Who is this servant?  If you were hearing Isaiah’s words, you would truly be baffled.  Is it Cyrus, Hezekiah, Eliakim, a missionary, Isaiah himself, a reincarnated Moses or Elijah, the nation of Israel, another king, God himself, is it the people of God corporately, are they individual ‘believers’, or is it an individual who is a messianic figure?  The options abound for the hearers.  He is a mystery man! Continue reading