Tag Archives: Moses

B90X Psalm 106

Golden calf

In Horev they fashioned a calf, they worshiped a cast metal image.  Thus they exchanged their Glory for the image of an ox that eats grass!  They forgot God, who had saved them, who had done great things in Egypt, wonder in the land of Ham, fearsome deeds by the Sea of Suf.  Therefore he said that he would destroy the, [and he would have,] had not Moshe his chosen one stood before him in the breach to turn back his destroying fury (Ps 106:19-23, CJB).

The location of the incident repeated above is originally found Exodus 32.  Quite a group of folks whom Moses had to lead out of Egypt into the Promised Land.

A couple of things that I was thinking about this morning as I read this:

1. There may not be a golden calf in which I have melted down all my gold to replace for God, yet, is there something instead?  Have I forgotten God and created something else in place of Him?  What have I called Yahweh instead of Father?  What have I exchanged my imago Dei for?

2. As a church we are participating in a Seder Dinner this March 7th.  The purpose of a Seder is to remember all that the Lord had done for the descendants of Abraham in setting up for them a land of promise, a land of refuge and peace, and a place to show Father’s glory.  Father was faithful in his promise, but the people were not.  The above says, “They forgot God, who had saved them, who had done great things in Egypt, wonder in the land of Ham, fearsome deeds by the Sea of Suf.”
The main point to a Seder is to never forget.
Not to forget,
not to forget who saved them,
not to forget the great things,
not to forget the wonder,
not to forget the fearsome deeds. 

Father, I pray we never forget all you have done for us.  From all you have redeemed us.  From the old.  From the degenerate.  From the habits.  From the addictions.  From it all.  Help us to have constant reminders of your glory in our lives and the image we possess and how that image is to interact with the world’s we live in.  Amen.

 

B90X2012 “Servant Song #1″

Imagine for a moment you are a citizen of Judah during the prophetic span of Isaiah’s ministry.  The dates maybe somewhere around 740-700 BC.  You saw your brothers in the North fall under siege to the Assyrians and there are strong, very strong warnings that the Babylonians are coming your way to do the same to you in the South.  Mingled in Isaiah’s words are those of hope.  A surprising mention of a servant.  In obviously distinctive and fresh language, a vision and an application of a servant who will do things for the nation never before seen or heard.  The ‘servant of God’ strand flowing through Isaiah marks a significant mysterious character whose qualities rival any prophet, priest, or king.  Five ‘songs’ are featured in the latter portions of Isaiah.

Who is this servant?  If you were hearing Isaiah’s words, you would truly be baffled.  Is it Cyrus, Hezekiah, Eliakim, a missionary, Isaiah himself, a reincarnated Moses or Elijah, the nation of Israel, another king, God himself, is it the people of God corporately, are they individual ‘believers’, or is it an individual who is a messianic figure?  The options abound for the hearers.  He is a mystery man!

The servant is first introduced in Is. 42:1-9 “Here is my servant” the great solution.

Vv. 1-4 God addresses Israel.  Justice is used three times in these verses (1, 3, and 4).  He is not just for Israel, but for the nations (Gentiles) (1). Notice how gentile he is and full of humility (2, 3).

Vv. 5-7  God (Ha’ El- “He who is indeed the true transcendent God”) addresses the Servant.  His purpose is delineated in (6,7) “a light for the Gentiles.”  There is a future reference to Is. 61 in v. 7 “to free the captives from prison and to release from the dungeon those who sit in darkness.” Also this verse looks back at Isaiah 7.

Vv. 8-9 God address Israel again.

There is a hint of opposition; his task is not easy, but doable.  The character and mission of the Servant: will bring salvation and a new world order.  The Spirit and justice dominate this ‘song.’

B90X2012 Jan 19 “Burning Bush and Favor”

It happened again.  Just going through material read so many times before and boom- something new.

Last year when we did B90X, I had an ambivalent reaction to Moses’ death at the end of Deuteronomy.   The man worked really hard for God.  I know he was called specifically for his work, but think about what he had before he left Egypt for his second 40 years of life to be a shepherd in the wilderness he would eventually wander in.  He put up with a ton of carp from a whole pile of rebellious people.  He even talked the Lord out of killing the whole lot of them one time (Num 14).

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B90X2012 Jan. 8 “Pharaoh knows best”

Reading through the Bible every year like this is kind of like going on a long road trip.  We have driven to Los Angeles from Colorado so many times that we know the places to stay, great places to eat, the long stretches of highway, and even where to change drivers.  Yet even in the redundancy of the drive, the same ol’ same ol’ scenery, we would see something new, find a new restaurant, or see Father’s hand in the adventure.

Reading through the Bible this time is once again, just like that.  We are reading very familiar stories. Even stories we have heard all our lives and probably did a flannel-graph of them.  We can retell them with vivid detail.

Yet, each and every time I read, there is something new.  For example, here is a short phrase I had not seen before today.  It is only four words.  Yet in its brevity, a powerful truth is reflected.

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B90X “the Servant of the LORD” Day 53 (Is 52:13- Is 66:18)

Another beautiful day in Colorado Saints!

Imagine for a moment you are a citizen of Judah during the prophetic span of Isaiah’s ministry.  The dates maybe somewhere around 740-700 BC.  You saw your brothers in the North fall underseige to the Assyrians and there are strong, very strong warnings that the Babylonians are coming your way to do the same to you in the South.  Mingled in Isaiah’s words are those of hope.  A surprising mention of a servant.  In obviously distinctive and fresh language, a vision and an application of a servant who will do things for the nation never before seen or heard.  The ‘servant of God’ strand flowing through Isaiah marks a significant mysterious character whose qualities rival any prophet, priest, or king.  Five ‘songs’ are featured in the latter portions of Isaiah.

 Who is this servant?  If you were hearing Isaiah’s words, you would truly be baffled.  Is it Cyrus, Hezekiah, Eliakim, a missionary, Isaiah himself, a reincarnated Moses or Elijah, the nation of Israel, another king, God himself, is it the people of God corporately, are they individual ‘believers’, or is it an individual who is a messianic figure?  The options abound for the hearers.  He is a mystery man! Continue reading