Tag Archives: God

But God

Are there two words that mean more than these two in our vocabulary?

They are like a wrecking ball, a 2×4 upside the noggin, or a tsunami about to hit shore.  Or conversely it can be the touch of a loving hand at just the right time, a gentle word that turns away wrath, an ordinance specialist dismantling a highly explosive bomb, a heralded arrival of Father’s Glory, or a soothing balm.  They both show a side of things often forgotten.  They reveal a nature outside our own.  They highlight a sovereign, loving Father whose ways are far above our ways.

But God chose the foolish things of the world to shame the wise; God chose the weak things of the world to shame the strong. 1 Cor 1:27 NIV

Indeed he was ill, and almost died. But God had mercy on him, and not on him only but also on me, to spare me sorrow upon sorrow. Phil 2:27 NIV

But God, being rich in mercy, because of His great love with which He loved us,  Eph 2:4 NASB

So you are no longer a slave, but God’s child; and since you are his child, God has made you also an heir.  Gal 4:7 NIV

I planted, Apollos watered, but God was causing the growth. 1 Cor 3:6 NASB

 

 

God- big, man- not.

universe

“The universe, they say, is so vast, it makes man utterly insignificant. Why would God have bothered to create such a microscopic speck called the earth and humanity and then get involved with us? Beneath this question is a fundamental failure to see what the universe is about. It is about the greatness of God, not the significance of man. God made man small and the universe big to say something about himself. And he says it for us to learn and enjoy—namely, that he is infinitely great and powerful and wise and beautiful. The more the Hubble Telescope sends back to us about the unfathomable depths of space, the more we should stand in awe of God. The disproportion between us and the universe is a parable about the disproportion between us and God. And it is an understatement.”   John Piper, Don’t Waste Your Life34.

Prayer for our Kids day 19 – Humility

“God, please cultivate in my children the ability to show true humility toward all” (Titus 3:2).

“Show true humility toward all.” Think about that for a minute. What does that look like, true humility to everyone? We live in a very proud nation. We’re proud to be Americans, proud to live in such a beautiful state as Colorado, proud of our families, our pets, jobs, kids, sports teams just to name a few. But, are we living how we were called?

humilityHere are a few more things to think about from the Bible on humility:

“Pride ends in humiliation, while humility brings honor” (Proverbs 29:23).

“Pride leads to disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom” (Proverbs 11:2).

“If you are wise and understand God’s ways, prove it by living an honorable life, doing good works with the humility that comes from wisdom” (James 3:12-14).

Pride leads to humiliation and disgrace. Humility brings honor, wisdom and good works.

I’ve always said that it’s important to take pride in your hard work for example, but I can’t find that anywhere in the Bible. Instead we are told to “work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people” (Colossians 3:23). I think I’m going to have to re-evaluate my entire life view after writing this.

What does it really look like to live in humility?

Guest Post- Rachel Theobald

B90X- Enjoy Father’s Story

silver amulet of priestly blessingNumbers may as well have been entitled “Rebellion and Grumblings.”

Over and over again, the contrast between Father’s faithfulness and Israel’s faithlessness erupt.

Think of all the stories where the people’s rebellion brought difficulty and  discipline to the newly emancipated slaves:
*Mariam and Aaron’s defiance of Moses leadership.  Mariam’s ensuing leprosy.
*Fussing about Moses and Aaron being in charge and the staff that budded.
*Mannah provided every morning. Because of complaining.
*Quail coming out their noses. See above reason.
*Unbelieving spies not trusting God and 40 years of needless wandering.
*Not having water to drink and Moses struggle with people, caused Moses to sin against God.
*Korahs rebellion.
*Phinehas running a spear through a man and foreign woman for having sex in the camp.  Incidently, a plague did stop after that.
*Balaks hiring of Balaam to curse the Israelites and not able to.

Our friends test God at every level, even while God is providing for their needs.

How often is my ‘grumble-ometer’ totally pegged on overload and Father continues to show himself faithful?  Numbers 14:18-19 says, “The Lord is slow to anger, abounding in love, and forgiving sin.”

The words we use either bless folks or curse them.  We have learned that it is better to bless, to encourage, to pray for, to forgive, to love, to bring life, and to see success in our selves, relationships, families, and town.  The above picture shows some of our churches favorite scripture.  It is a small silver scroll found in 1979 in the desert of  Israel.  Marked as the most significant archaeological find ever, it dates back to the 7th century BCE.  The paleo-Hebrew scrawl says, “May the Lord bless you and keep you, May the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you, May the Lord turn his face towards you and give you peace”  Numbers 6:22-24 affectionately called the Priestly Blessing or Aaronic Blessing.

B90X Leviticus Explained

leviticus redrawnOne of the stubbornly enduring habits of the human race is to insist on domesticating God. We are determined to tame him. We figure out ways to harness God to our projects. We try to reduce God to a size that conveniently fits our plans and ambitions and tastes.

But our Scriptures are even more stubborn in telling us that we can’t do it. God cannot be fit into our plans, we must fit into his.  We can’t use God– God is not a tool or appliance or credit card.

“Holy” is the word that sets God apart and above our attempts to enlist him in our wish-fulfillment fantasies or our utopian schemes for making our mark in the world. Holy means that God is alive on God’s terms, alive in a way that exceeds our experience and imagination.  Holy refers to the life burning with an intense purity that transforms everything it touches into itself.

Because the core of all living is God, and God is a holy God, we require much teaching and long training for living in response to God as he is and not as we want him to be.  The book of Leviticus is a narrative pause in the story of our ancestors as they are on their way, saved out of Egypt, to settle in the land of Canaan.  It is a kind of extended time-out of instruction, a detailed and meticulous preparation for living ‘holy’ in a culture that doesn’t have the faintest idea what “holy” is. The moment these people enter Canaan they will be picking their way through a lethal minefield of gods and goddesses that are designed to appeal to our god-fantasies: “Give us what we want when we want it on our own terms.”  What these god-fantasies in fact do is cripple or kill us.  Leviticus is a start at the “much teaching and long training” that continues to be adapted and reworked in every country and culture where God is forming a saved people to live as he created them to live– holy as God is holy.

The first thing that strikes us as we read Leviticus in this light is that this holy God is actually present with us and virtually every detail of our lives is affected by the presence of this holy God; nothing in us, our relationships, or environment is left out. The second thing is that God provides a way (sacrifices and feasts and Sabbaths) to bring everything in and about us into his holy presence, transformed in the fiery blaze of the holy. It is an awesome thing to come into his presence, and we, like ancient Israel, stand in his presence at every moment (Psalm 139). Our Lord is not dwelling in a tent or house in our neighborhood. But he makes his habitation in us and among us as believers and says, “I am holy, you be holy” (1 Peter 1:16, citing Leviticus 11:44-45; 19:2; 20:7).

Once we realize this, the seemingly endless details and instructions of Leviticus become sign posts of good news to us: God cares that much about the details of our lives, willing everything in and about us into transformation that St. Paul later commended:

So her’s what I want you to do, God helping you: Take your everyday, ordinary life– your sleeping, eating, going-to-work, and walking around life– and place it before God as an offering. Embracing what God does for you in the best thing you can do for him.  Don’t become so well-adjusted to your culture that you fit into it without even thinking.  Instead, fix your attention on God.  You’ll be changed from the inside out. Readily recognize what he wants from you, and quickly respond to it. Unlike the culture around you, always dragging you down to its level of immaturity, God brings the best out of you, develops well-formed maturity in you (Romans 12:1-2).

The above is the introduction to Leviticus in the Message Bible.  How often have I ridiculed and made jokes of the book.  Too many to count.  Instead it is one of Father’s most important bits of instruction on how to live life and He leaves no stone unturned.  Blessings as you plow through.