Tag Archives: Denver Seminary

B90X Genesis

When one reads through the Bible in 90 days, it only takes four days to get through all 50 chapters of Genesis.

Genesis is easy reading.  It is also full of crazy stories that seem like they just are made up, almost unbelievable.  It is the collection of the beginning of earthly existence for the heavens and the earth from the macro to the micro.  One sees the hand of God present and active in the lives of some very unlikely characters hosting the power, life, and legacy of the Lord.

Today at CRBC, to kick of the weekly series of sermons as we walk through the Bible, was my preaching professor, Scott Wenig.

Interestingly, as I read through Genesis this go-round, Joseph made a heightened impression on me.  His integrity, his wisdom, his patience, and his faith seemed to all speak voluminously to faithful believers for millennia to come.

Joseph and potipers wifeJoseph and his life was the subject-du-jour for us today.  The big idea was this, “Do you believe that God is always good and that He is always at work in your life?”  That question needs be be answered with a resounding, “yes.”   If not, that is a good goal to reach for.  It is good to make that connection.  To see God as bad, absent, or an antagonist to your life is no way to live and think.

For the next few days, as you read through some of the more challenging portions of scripture, ask your self this question and see what kinds of ideas you have.  Hopefully you will answer in the affirmative time and time again.

“Increase our faith!”

Weighing in on the Fourth C. Papyrus.

No one really knows where it came from. The fragment of papyrus is no bigger than a business card. First surfacing in 1997, the wispy section of fiber contains portions of sentences scrawled  in Coptic professing, quite clearly, that Jesus had a wife and that it is OK for her to be one of his disciples.

Papyrologists struggle with empirical evidence of those who state the document is authentic. The type of material, the ink used, the language, the wording, the style of lettering, the apparent emboldening of the word TA for “my” preceding wife, and much more. Is it a forgery just to throw folks who say his singleness and celibacy are relevant to his divinity, message, and lifestyle?

It is certainly possible for this to be authentic in date. However, the question arises as to the author and the purpose of the writing. Gnostic gospels and writings have for millennium been known for their errant descriptions and fictitious nature, almost revisionist in pursuit of something completely different than the historic Jesus.

Would it matter to any of us? Does it change how we perceive and/or Jesus?Does it change his message? What if it were true that Jesus were married? What if the gospel writers, Paul, Peter, and even James and Jude, both half-brothers of Jesus kept that information from us in their letters? Much less that it potentially was Mary Magdalene, a woman of questionable career choice early in life?

Or is this just a red-herring to whip folks into a frenzy? A ruse to mess with the Catholic Church tradition of single clerics?

Here are some links detailed articles on the matter:
Our own very own, Denver Post

NT Blog - “The Gospel of Jesus’ Wife” blog post

Concordia Theology BlogAn Ancient Manuscript and Jesus’ Wife?

From the Boston Globe “Harvard professor identifies scrap of papyrus suggesting some early Christians believed Jesus was married”

Francis Watson, Durham University, U.K. - “The Gospel of Jesus’ Wife: How a fake Gospel-Fragment was composed.”

Thank you Denver Seminary for your ongoing scholarly work on matters like this. You force me and others to think theologically, spiritually, and worshipfully.

“Soul Feed”

One must constantly be on the look out for danger signs in their spiritual health. Whether you have a built in meter to help with this, or you have a friend or spouse super willing to bring up stagnancy, which may lead to sin,  spiritual health is critical. Holistically speaking our spiritual health is inexorably tied to our mental and physical health.  So it is vital that we keep all parts of our beings maintained and running healthily.

In an effort to find fresh ways of feeding my soul, I have prayed and decided to audit a class at DenSem called “Reading the Spiritual Masters.”  It is my goal to really stick with it as most MDiv grads who do an audit like this tend to fall off pretty quickly when there is no risk on the line.

One of the reasons I chose this class is the prof.  Howard Baker is a really cool man who has helped shape some of my faith practices.

I have already received the books and begun to meditate on some of the material.  One of the books is a tractate titled “Golden Booklet of the True Christian Life” by John Calvin (I’ll call it GBTCL from now on).  Typically John Calvin is not one of my more favorite reads.  First, they are usually more of a magnum opus and secondly, the interpreters of his French and Latin don’t work for my sophomoric mind. However this small volume is interpreted more palatably for my vocabulary.

A long introduction to a short paragraph about scripture:

The goal of the new life is that God’s children exhibit melody and harmony in their conduct.  What melody?  The song of God’s justice.  What harmony?  The harmony between god’s righteousness and our obedience.

Only if we walk in the beauty of God’s law do we become sure of our adoption as children of the Father.

The law of God contains in itself the dynamic of the new life by which his image is fully restored in us; but by nature we are sluggish, and therefore we need to be simulated, aided in our efforts by a guiding principle.

A sincere repentance from the heart does not guarantee that we shall not wander from the straight path and sometimes become bewildered.

Let us then search scripture to find the root principle for the reformation of our life.

In the words of the most interesting man in the world, “Stay thirsty my friends.”