Tag Archives: churches in Castle Rock

Prayer for our Kids Day 21 – Contentment

“Father, teach my children the secret of being content in any and every situation, ‘through Him who gives them strength’” (Philippians 4:12-13).

contentmentContentment is definitely not something that our country is generally familiar with. On the contrary, we are surrounded by advertisements trying to get us to buy a newer version of what we already have. Being content with our life or belongings is not popular to say the least.

This verse from Philippians adds so much power to this prayer because being content is hard to do, but being thankful and appreciate for what Father has blessed us with is possible through His strength.

I want my kids to always desire to push themselves to be better, but I want them to be thankful for all that they have. We are a tremendously blessed nation and I want them to see that.

A popular saying right now is, “first world problems”, meaning we complain about things that people in third world countries don’t even know exist. Let’s be thankful for all the wonderful things Father has blessed us with and prayerfully encourage our kids to do the same.

Guest Post- Rachel Theobald

Repost- Ten things church members want in a pastor

Many of my articles come from the perspective of pastors. That will not change in the future. I am an advocate of pastors and I desire God’s best for them. I have no plans to change my advocacy role.

As a change of pace, however, I recently asked a few hundred laypersons to write down what they desired of a pastor. Their responses were open-ended, and there was no limitation on the number of items they could list. Though my approach was not scientific, these laypersons did represent over sixty churches.

Here are their top ten responses in order of frequency. Since many of them gave one or more sentences as a response, I can provide a representative comment by each of the responses.

The list of ten items is found here.

I’d love to hear if this resonates or if there are other thoughts.

B90X- Final thoughts on Joshua 2013.01.20

Deeply embedded in almost every part of the Bible is a tension between the holiness of God and his graciousness.

As a holy God he demands compliance with his law, set before human beings choices of obedience or disobedience on which are conditioned blessing or judgment.

As a merciful, gracious, and compassionate God, he makes unconditional promises reflecting the grace and favor he has set on his people.

Joshua 1:1-8 expresses no less than ten “will”s, of which the Lord is personally speaking to a stalwart of a man, of which every one of them were fulfilled.

What was true for Joshua is certainly true for each of us- “Do not let this Book of the Law (probably Deuteronomy) depart from your mouth; meditate (hagah) on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do everything written in it.  Then you will be prosperous and successful” (Josh1:8).

Then to close the book, Joshua sums up everything ever learned from Moses and challenges the people, “Now fear the Lord and serve him with all faithfulness.  Throw away the gods your forefathers worshiped beyond the River and in Egypt, and serve the Lord.  But if serving the Lord seems undesirable to, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your forefathers served beyond the River, or the Gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living.  But as for me and my household, we will serve the Lord” (Josh 24:14-15).

Each of us is going to worship and serve something.  What or who is it going to be for you?

B90X- How Joshua points to the New Testament 2013.01.19

strong and courageousIn kind of a short look back at the week, a point struck me regarding the person of Joshua, some of the theological ideas in that story and how they point to a future Messiah and Kingdom of God.

We are so fortunate to live in history when we have the cannon.  We are able to read back and make connections that men like Joshua or the disciples only had bits and pieces of information in putting together their worldviews.  The way we can read Israel’s story and the thread of redemption woven through it, is grace to us.  How much more revelation do any of us need to comprehend and grasp the love Father has for us?

Here are a few things found in Joshua which point to events and ideas found when and after Jesus came:

  1. The Name of Joshua and Jesus.  The name of Joshua  means “the Lord is our salvation.”  Interestingly enough the English Jesus is a derivation of the Greek which is a derivation of the Hebrew.  So etymologically, their names mean the same thing and their roles and nature line up dramatically.
  2. The Promises Rest-  Josh was leading Israel into their inheritance, into their rest (Deut 3:20; 12:10; 25:19; Josh. 1:13, 15; 21:44; 22:4; 23:1).  But at best a temporary rest from enemies, for Israel would have many more foes in the centuries ahead.  From the vantage point of the NT, Joshua’s successes were only partial at best, and therefore they pointed beyond themselves to a time when Joshua’s greater namesake, Jesus, would bring God’s people into an inheritance that could not be taken away from them (1 Peter 1:3-5).  Jesus would provide the rest Joshua had not attained (Heb 3:11, 18; 4:1-11).
  3. Models of Faith- The people of Israel at the battle of Jericho and Rahab the prostitute are presented as models of faith, examples of those who were looking for a country (Heb 11:30-31; 11:14-16), but who did not attain what was promised (11:39_40), because God had planned something better.
  4. God’s Warrior- According to the NT, Jesus is not only Joshua’s greater namesake, but he is also the Divine Warrior, the captain of the Lord’s Army who fights in behalf of his people and achieves victory for them (Josh. 5:13-15; Rev. 19:11-16).  The inheritance he gives is not a stretch of rocky land in the eastern Mediterranean, but rather renewed heavens and earth and a heavenly city (Rev. 1-2).
  5. The Conquest- Many have made comparisons between Joshua and the book of Acts.  After redemption from Egypt in the Exodus, Israel began the conquest of her inheritance; after the redemptive work of Jesus at the cross, his people move forward to conquer the world in his name.  Israel enjoyed an earthly inheritance and an earthly kingdom but the kingdom of which the church is a part is spiritual and heavenly.

Sidenote- for some of you struggling to rearrange your daily schedule to get the hour or so reading done everyday, I ran across this article that gives a few pointers on how it  can be done.  Stay after it!!  Reading all of God’s words in this rapid fashion is so worth it.