Tag Archives: B90X

B90X2012 Jan 19 “Burning Bush and Favor”

It happened again.  Just going through material read so many times before and boom- something new.

Last year when we did B90X, I had an ambivalent reaction to Moses’ death at the end of Deuteronomy.   The man worked really hard for God.  I know he was called specifically for his work, but think about what he had before he left Egypt for his second 40 years of life to be a shepherd in the wilderness he would eventually wander in.  He put up with a ton of carp from a whole pile of rebellious people.  He even talked the Lord out of killing the whole lot of them one time (Num 14).

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“Pharaoh’s hardened heart” Justin Taylor’s ideas.

I have read material of Justin’s in the past.  Normally,  thoughtful and engaging. This article jumped out today as timely.  I know that lots of folks question the issue of Pharaoh’s heart.  Why are so many verses reflective of the issue?  Why Does the Lord do this?  How does the sovereignty of God play into all of this?

I skimmed through the post and will process the information at a later time. See what you think about the matter.  What have you concluded in the matter? How would you have done things differently if you were Pharaoh?  Or the Lord?

If you want to take the time to read through, it is certainly thought provoking. Here is the article for you pleasure.  Enjoy.  If you have a response, I’d love to hear it.

http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/2012/01/04/the-hardening-of-pharoahs-heart/

B90X2012 Jan. 8 “Pharaoh knows best”

Reading through the Bible every year like this is kind of like going on a long road trip.  We have driven to Los Angeles from Colorado so many times that we know the places to stay, great places to eat, the long stretches of highway, and even where to change drivers.  Yet even in the redundancy of the drive, the same ol’ same ol’ scenery, we would see something new, find a new restaurant, or see Father’s hand in the adventure.

Reading through the Bible this time is once again, just like that.  We are reading very familiar stories. Even stories we have heard all our lives and probably did a flannel-graph of them.  We can retell them with vivid detail.

Yet, each and every time I read, there is something new.  For example, here is a short phrase I had not seen before today.  It is only four words.  Yet in its brevity, a powerful truth is reflected.

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B90X Jan. 5, 2012 “Randomness and Names”

You are probably just getting to the place where you say, “Man the Bible is awesome!”  And you are probably just to the place where you are saying, “Man how do I keep up this pace of reading?”  Stay at it.  You can do it.  So many have before you. Trust me, you will develop habits and patterns which will help in the discipline of reading everyday.

Here we are friends, just about half way through Genesis.  Wasn’t it so cool reading all of Job after starting Genesis?  I loved that.  I can’t wait to see how it works out through the rest of the books.

One thing I noticed today as I was reading was randomness.  There would be a flow in a story and boom, from out of nowhere, there is a shift in thought or action that seems so out of place.  One of those places was Genesis 36:24.  Nearly all of Chapter 36 is a genealogy of Esau’s kin.  The sons of Zibeon are listed with one of them being Anah.  Then just out of nowhere in an attempt to clarify which Anah the author is referring, Anah is described.  ”This is the Anah who discovered the hot springs in the desert while he was grazing the donkeys of his father Zibeon.”

Now, as you may well know, after reading this, I stopped to think about what I just read, and came up with all sorts of questions.  Do you ever do that?  Do you find something and ruminate on it?  It is sort of a restless inquisitiveness of mine.   Anyways, I digress.  Here is a smattering of some of the things I was thinking of:

Where are these hot springs?
How hot are they?
Did anyone ever visit there before Anah discovered them?
What were the surroundings like? Lush? Dry and sandy?
Was he alone when he was herding his donkeys?
Did he jump in as he discovered them?
Did this become a destination for others?
Did it turn into a resort?
Are they there today and what do they look like?

Then there was the flow of names.  The endless list of names.  All the begat-ting, all the genealogies, all the lineage.  I have to be honest, there have been times in the past when I would come to a list of names and just skip over them.  Come on, I know you have done it too.  This time through, I decided to do something different, read them all.  Really try to pronounce the name.  Try to get a feel for what that persons name would sound like for a mother or father to say it several times a day.

Isn’t it cool how someone was named based on the circumstances of the moment? If a man was in a tight spot, he would name his kid Tight Spot.  Another may be ‘band of raiders’ or ‘he provides justice.’  Nearly all names have a form of the Lord’s name embedded in it.  Constant reminders every time the person’s name is breathed, who it is which is behind all of human life.

I have to admit there are some pretty funny sounding names.  And for a family to have two names of children so close in sound to each other side by side.  It makes me chuckle.  Like Ishvah and Ishvi (Gen 46:17).  Or Muppim and Huppim (46:21), I wonder what those mean?  One of the funniest names has to be Oholibamah.  For some reason the face of a contemporary flashes through my mental faculties every time I read it.

Have a great day.  Grace and peace.

B90X Jan 3, 2012 “Something about Job”

Some people don’t like Job.  Yes, its true.  I have heard them say it.  So this blog will hopefully clear up something about the complexity of the book.

Overwhelmed by suffering, Job was not comforted, but condemned by his friends.  Each of their views represents a well-known way to understand suffering.  God proves that each explanation given by Job’s friends has less than the whole answer.

First, let me say that reading through the Bible Chronologically is going to be very cool.  Already, after jumping from Genesis 11 to Job 1 there was a mercurial excitement, not the predictable sameness we are so used to when beginning the Pentateuch.

Men with profound erudition have been able to boil down the seemingly endless prolix narrative of Job.  It all just gets jumbled and pointless after awhile, so let me share a little something I came across:

The only way any of Job’s friends help is by silencing their diatribes for seven days.  Allowing Job to have plenty of time to think through his mourning and crank up the pity-party.

Eliphaz explains Job’s pain by intimating that his suffering is because he sinned. His advice to Job is to go to God and lay his cause before God (5:8).  Job retorts with demands that Eliphaz take back his accusations (6:29).  In the end, God rebukes Eliphaz (42:7).

Bildad thinks that Job is hiding his sin and won’t admit it, so Job must suffer.  He encourages Job to give up and confess (8:2).  Bildad wants Job to confront God and ask what charges God has against Job (10:2).  Like Eliphaz, God rebukes Bildad (42:7).

Zophar is the more Pharisaical, religious one, he thinks Job deserves even more suffering than he has already experienced.  He advices Job to get rid of his sins (11:13, 14).  Job stands firm and doesn’t fall into Zophar’s super-pious hubris, and knows that he will be justified (13:18).  He too is lumped with Job’s other friends who have no valuable advise (42:7).

The youngster, Elihu, is the only one who gets close to getting it right, albeit wrong.  He thinks God is using the suffering to mold and train Job.  He is just a bit off, yet instructs Job to be silent and he will be taught wisdom (33:33).  Because God doesn’t deal directly with Elihu, we are left to wonder if his analysis is correct.

In the end, we hear from God himself.  Job is confronted by God and is told to be content without knowing why he is suffering.  There is no reason given for the suffering and asks Job how long he wants to argue with the Almighty (40:2).  Job realizes he was talking about things he did  not understand (42:3-5).